Gehayi (gehayi) wrote in femgenficathon,
Gehayi
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Unclaimed Prompts: FemGen Free-For-All

The signups for FemGen 2011 are now closed.

But, if you still want to participate...here are the unclaimed prompts. You can write female character/female-identified-character fic of any length or create woman-centric art based on any of these prompts--even if you didn't sign up for femgenficathon. (This is along the lines of Yuletide Madness.)

Enjoy!

***

38) Do you think it not lawful for me to teach women and why do you call me to teach the court? -- Anne Hutchinson (1591-1643), Puritan preacher, religious dissident, early advocate for women's equality, women's rights and an end to racial prejudice who was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for heresy. Co-founder of settlement in Rhode Island.

46) But when a young lady is to be a heroine, the perverseness of forty surrounding families cannot prevent her. Something must and will happen to throw a hero in her way. -- Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), English novelist.

51) Beautiful is your repose, O Lord of the Gods, in your Temple of millions of years! I play the sistra before your fair face, I please you because of your goodness. --Nefertari Meryetmut (born c.1290 B.C.E.- died c. 1225 B.C.E.), Egyptian queen and Great Royal Wife of Ramesses II.

52) You dare to cry out Liberty, when you hold us in places against our will, driving us from place to place as if we were beasts. -- Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins (c.1844 – 1891), also known as Thocmentony ("Shell Flower"), Paiute educator, translator, lecturer, activist and author. First Native American woman to copyright her writing and first Native American woman to publish a book in English.

56) Sacredness of human life! The world has never believed it! It has been with life that we settled our quarrels, won wives, gold and land, defended ideas, imposed religions. We have held that a death toll was a necessary part of every human achievement, whether sport, war or industry. A moment's rage over the horror of it, and we have sunk into indifference. -- Ida M. Tarbell (1857-1944), American investigative journalist and author.

57) Great doubt will eventually lead to great awakening. . -- Rabia al-Adawiya (circa 717-801), also known as Rabia al-Basri, 8th-century mystic. She is a highly esteemed early Sufi poet, and the first female Sufi saint.

74) Independence I have long considered as the grand blessing of life, the basis of every virtue; and independence I will ever secure by contracting my wants, though I were to live on a barren heath. -- Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), English political theorist, translator, reviewer, educator, author and advocate of women's education and women's rights.

78) If I waited to be right before I spoke, I would be sending little cryptic messages on the Ouija board, complaints from the other side. -- Audre Lorde (1934-1992), Caribbean-American author, poet, essayist, political theorist and activist.

79) There are few things more disturbing than to find, in somebody we detest, a moral quality which seems demonstrably superior to anything we ourselves possess. It argues not merely an unfairness on the part of creation, but a lack of artistic judgement. -- Pamela Hansford Johnson (1912-1981), English novelist, playwright, poet, reviewer, translator and social critic.

91) To have a good enemy, choose a friend; he knows where to strike. -- Diane de Poitiers (1499-1566), French courtier and favorite mistress of Henri II of France.

93) There are many things in your heart you can never tell to another person. They are you, your private joys and sorrows, and you can never tell them. You cheapen yourself, the inside of yourself, when you tell them. -- Greta Garbo (1905-1990), noted Swedish-born American actress, four-time Oscar nominee and recluse.

96) We are so vain that we even care for the opinions of those we don't care for. Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach (1830-1916), Austrian author of psychological novels.

97) The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it. --Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), American novelist, short story writer and reviewer.

103) A whisper can be stronger, as an atom is stronger, than a whole mountain. -- Louise Nevelson (1900-1988), Russian-born American sculptor and painter.

105) My address is like my shoes. It travels with me. I abide where there is a fight against wrong. -- Mother Jones (1830 or 1837-1930), Irish-born American labor organizer, member of the Knights of Labor, deeply involved with the United Mine Workers, and organizer of a strike of children working in mills and mines.

106) ...[T]he court of a princess ought to be like a well-regulated abbey where the monks have an oath that they will say nothing to outsiders about their secrets or anything that may happen among them. In just the same way ladies and women of the court ought to love and support each other like sisters. They ought not to quarrel with one another in the ladies' apartments, nor betray each other behind their backs like fishwives, for such things are extremely unbecoming at the court of a princess, and they ought not to be allowed. --Christine de Pizan(or de Pisan) (1365-circa 1434), Venetian-born poet, scholar, author and protofeminist. Noted as Europe's first professional author. Author of the only contemporary writing about Joan of Arc that exists outside of the records of Joan's trial.

109) Justice is better than chivalry if we cannot have both. -- Alice Stone Blackwell (1857-1950), American editor, translator and activist for women's rights.

110) You should know how terrible a weapon belief is, especially in the wrong hands. And how do you tell which hands are wrong? -- Diane Duane (born May 18, 1952), American author of both science fiction and fantasy.

112) ...anywhere there is
a man or woman of great worth,
people who envy their good fortune
often say evil things about them;
they want to ruin their reputation.
Thus they act like
vicious, cowardly dogs
who bite people treacherously.
I don't propose to give up because of that;
if spiteful critics or slanderers
wish to turn my accomplishments against me,
they have a right to their evil talk.
-- Marie de France (12th century), French trobairitz (female troubadour).

115) ...let us hawk, hunt, race, and do the like exercises that men have; and let us converse in camps, courts, and cities; in schools, colleges, and courts of judicature; in taverns, brothels, and gaming houses; all of which will make our strength and wit known, both to men and to our own selves, for we are as ignorant of ourselves as men are of us. And how should we know ourselves, when we never made a trial of ourselves? -- Margaret Cavendish (1623 – 1673), English author, playwright, poet, essayist and scientist. She was the only 17th-century woman to publish works on natural philosophy. Her novel, The Blazing World, is one of the earliest examples of science fiction.

120) 'Tis better with the truth offend,
than please with flattering words
For truth at length shall keep thee safe
when t'other cuts like swords.
--Isabella Whitney (born late 1540s--flourished 1567–1573), first professional female poet in England and the first woman known to have published secular poetry in English.

129) ...man was created of the dust of the earth, but woman was made of a part of man, after that he was a living soul. Yet was she not produced from Adam's foot, to be his too low inferior; nor from his head to be his superior, but from his side, near his heart, to be his equal; that where he is Lord, she may be Lady.--Rachel Speght (born 1597, death date unknown), English Calvinist poet, pamphleteer and critic of misogynistic ideas about women.

133) Friends are each other's mirrors, and should be
Clearer than crystal or the mountain springs,
And free from clouds, design, or flattery.
--Katherine Philips (1632 – 1664), Anglo-Welsh poet who wrote extensively on female friendship.

135) Then [my Lord of London] asked me why I had so few words, and I answered, "God hath given me the gift of knowledge, but not of utterance. And Solomon saith that a woman of few words is a gift of God." -- Anne Askew (c. 1520-1546), English poet and Protestant martyr, She is the only woman on record as having been tortured in the Tower of London before being burned at the stake. (To put this quotation in context, the lord is asking why she will not talk, since she's been threatened with the rack if she doesn't.)

143) Time...is not a great healer. It is an indifferent and perfunctory one. Sometimes it does not heal at all. And sometimes when it seems to, no healing has been necessary. -- Ivy Compton-Burnett (1884-1969), English novelist.

151) I have done this according to the design of my heart. ... I have restored that which was in ruins, I have raised up that which was unfinished... -- Hatshepsut(1508–1458 B.C.E.), fifth Pharaoh of the eighteenth dynasty of Egypt.

152) We specialize in the wholly impossible. -- Nannie Helen Burroughs (1879-1961), educator, religious leader, activist and early supporter of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Tags: admin, femgen 2011, femgen free-for-all, mod post, prompts, unclaimed
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